Not As Shitty As You Think


In Azerbaijan if you are socially active in any way, the question “Why are you so politicized?” will follow you everywhere. Old classmates, neighbors, facebook contacts – everyone will be willing to know the answer.

And no matter what you answer, another question will follow: “Do you really think these people can change?” (usually stressed on the word these).

“No”, I usually say, “but I do believe”.

***

The first thing you will notice when arrive to Azerbaijan is writings. No, I’m not talking about the regular road writings and signs that tell you were to GO or not. These ones are special – they tell what to DO or not.

“Don’t throw garbage here”, say writings on fences, usually accompanied by untranslatable strong language.

“Don’t steal the soap!”, written on papers taped to the walls of public WC’s. Strong language enclosed.

“Don’t ask for grocery on credit”, says the door of a grocery store.

“Don’t push this button!”.

“Leave the door opened/closed!”

“Keep the crane pulled!” and etc.

And, well, what do you think is the first thing to notice right in front of the negligent “No parking” writing? A parked car, of course. Grocery stores fill with those who want stuff on credit, the forbidden buttons get pushed constantly, the doors are being left open or closed – depends on what’s the opposite to the writing.

These are not just random writings, it’s the way we live. It’s about the messages we program ourselves with and the way we perceive the world around. About underestimating each other and the lack of hope.

So, why not put things like “Life is not as shitty as you think but beautiful and short.  Hurry up to live it”

or “Be kind”

“Smile”

“Be yourself”

“Look around”

or the most important “Believe”.

Because these are the words we actually need to hear, read and remind ourselves every day.

And the old ones? No one reads them anyway.

***

What message would you put on your fence?

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    • KostyaArmenia
    • April 2nd, 2010

    When I was reading this post, a smile appeared on my face because I had this strong impression that you are actually describing Armenia:) Great subject my friend! Thumbs up!!!

      • Fatalin
      • April 2nd, 2010

      Thank you, dear )

    • Dorin
    • April 2nd, 2010

    Looks also like you are describing Romania 🙂
    As for all the messages that start with ‘don’t’ well i can only say that those who have this initiative aren’t familiar with the fact that the human brain doesn’t process negatives (such as the word “don’t” or “no”) and only processes the command that follows… if i tell you “don’t picture a pink elephant” what is it that you do? of course you imagine for a very short moment a pink elephant :))
    So maybe people in charge of putting up signs should first learn some basics about the way our mind works and processes messages and then decide what to write on those signs…

      • Fatalin
      • April 2nd, 2010

      Haha, yeah exactly.

    • ilady
    • April 2nd, 2010

    Good post, indeed:). Guess, not only Azerbaijan, Armenia or Romania, but many other countries of Eastern Europe or the former USSR…

    Would like to add some rights we do have:
    We all have right to:
    – to make a mistake;
    – to fall in love;
    – to believe in God;
    – to be silent;
    – to be different;
    – to be Yourself 🙂

    Have a good day!

    regards from Kutaisi, Georgia 🙂

  1. super!

    • Ilkin
    • April 10th, 2010

    So, why not put things like “Life is not as shitty as you think but beautiful and short. Hurry up to live it”

    or “Be kind”

    “Smile”

    “Be yourself”

    “Look around”

    or the most important “Believe”.
    ——————————

    Because everyone will do the opposite, of course… 🙂

    Just imagine, what if on every fence there would be something like “Be bad”, “Throw garbage here, pleeeease”, “Park here, don`t you think about others!”, “Don`t be silly, do as everyone does” etc. 🙂 Life would be great, as everyone would DO THE OPPOSITE -)

    P.S. The same situation is in Armenia, Russia, and all other post-soviet countries…God damned us.

      • Fatalin
      • April 10th, 2010

      hahaha this is even a better idea! I’m sooo in :)))

        • Ilkin
        • April 10th, 2010

        Would be nice experiment )) Start from your neighbourhood, then manage some sociological poll, what changes your idea caused to people )))))

        P.S. I do remember writings on the walls in Nasimi district saying “Axirete hazirsan?..” 🙂 I translated it like “Gotov li ti oxeret?” 🙂

          • Fatalin
          • April 10th, 2010

          hahaha zdes – vsegda gotov 😀

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