Archive for the ‘ Police ’ Category

Terrorists in Azerbaijan. Again?

Last month a friend of mine contacted me from France, asking “what the hell is going on in Azerbaijan?!”. Apparently, she saw the notification that the Embassy of the United States has posted on its webpage, which warned about a terroristic threat and advised its citizens to “remain vigilant, particularly in public places associated with the Western community.” A reminder was posted again on February 11th. Some media sources reported the same alerts being posted on the UK embassy’s webpage, but I couldn’t find it anywhere.

On February 14th news about the temporary closure of the Israeli embassy for “technical reasons” broke. The next day it was reported the embassy was back at work, but again, some media sources denied this information.

Today, around 18.00 one of the central streets (BulBul Avenue) was shut down because of an information about a bomb planted. The pedestrians were asked not to cross the street, the traffic was forbidden. According to RFE/RL Baku, the situation was provoked by an anonymous call about an unknown box left on the street (which is more than a common thing to see in Azerbaijan, but still). The police closed the subway and kept the box surrounded for 45 minutes. The paramedics were also waiting at the scene. It turned out the suspicious object was just an empty shoe box.

The last terrorist attack took place in Azerbaijan in April 30, 2009 in the State Oil Academy. The officials report about 13 people killed and 10 injured. The terrorist, a Georgian citizen of Azerbaijani descent, reportedly committed suicide at the scene.

Sandmonkey on MSNBC

Famous Egyptian blogger Sandmonkey, who I recently interviewed for RFE/RL and who later was arrested, assaulted and basically robbed by the Egyptian police, is talking on MSNBC from Tahrir square here.

Sandmonkey Arrested! You – next.

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The most famous Egyptian English-speaking blogger Sandmonkey, the one I made an interview for RFE/RL two days ago with was arrested today.

First the message was spread on Twitter, saying his father tried to call him, but someone else picked up the phone and said “You are next”.

I’ve also tried to call, the same person picked up and first said: “Efendim”, which is used for “Hello” in Turkish (apparently it is also used in Egypt). I asked if I can speak to Mahmood, the person replied: “Who are you?”. I asked the same question again, the replied: “Who are you and where are you from?”. I asked again if I can speak to Mahmood, the person replied: “Mahmood – police. You – next”, and hung up.

I called again the second time and asked if they can tell me if Mahmood’s all right and not injured. The person said “Mahmood okay”. I asked how long he’ll have to stay in the police, the person shouted: “Okay!! Bye bye bye bye”, and hung up. Now Sandmonkey’s phone is off.

A friend of him contacted me, saying her brother was with him. She is trying to call but someone picks up and doesn’t speak.

At the moment, we are trying to spread the information among international community.

In our conversations during this week, he told me the State Security was using different kind of tricks to find him.

UPD: Sandmonkey’s blog is down. The screen says This Account Has Been Suspended

UPD: Sandmonkey was reportedly arrested when he was delivering medical supplies to people on Tahrir Square.

UPD: Sandmonkey is reportely held in Abdeen Police Station in Cairo (?)

Under this link you can find the last blog post of Sandmonkey cached

UPD: Huffington Post mention

UPD: some tweets report Sandmonkey was first attacked by thugs. NOT CONFIRMED

UPD: Al Jazeera’s Yourmedia just mentioned Sandmonkey’s arrest live: “We receive reports that prominent blogger Sandmonkey has been arrested. We heard a lot of him, we know him, he was updating his twitter but not for 5 hours now”.

UPD: Apparently Sandmonkey’s phone is back on. Facebook user Jylan Khairat says: I just called his phone also and someone else answered pretending to be him, then he said in arabic “we’ll get you all”.

UPD: some tweets report Sandmonkey has been released. Some say he escaped. He and his friends have been beaten, his car destroyed, his phone confiscated, the medical supplies stolen. Trying to confirm now.

UPD: Twitter user RamyYaacoub reports: On the phone with @SandMonkey: “We were released, we did NOT run away . . . heading back to safety now” #SandMonkey

UPD: Twitter user RamyYaacoub reports: @SandMonkey: “We were just released after a 2 hour arrest, the beating came before the arrest” #SandMonkey

@RamyYaacoubSandMonkey: “My car is completely destroyed, my cellphone was taken, we were saved by my friend’s extra phone”#SandMonkey

UPD: @RamyYaacoub: @SandMonkey: “Massive Chaos ensued before we got arrested, my phone is gone, money, and car is destroyed” #SandMonkey

UPD: BBC also reported his arrest and release.

UPD: Sandmonkey on Facebook: “I am ok. My car destroyed, was beaten, but am fine. don’t call my cell and delete me from ur bbm until i get it back.”

On Twitter: RT @Sandmonkey: I am ok. I got out. I was ambushed & beaten by the police, my phone confiscated , my car ripped apar& supplies taken #jan25

Last update from my telephone conversation with Sandmonkey:

He and his friends were driving the car to Tahrir square to deliver medical supplies to people, when Mubarak’s people approached them. They managed to escape and stopped by the police point to seek help. Instead, police officer took the keys of his car and ordered people to attack them. They were in the car, while around 100 people were destroying it.

He managed to escape the car from the other door, but was taken to the police station. There they confiscated his phone and money, and ripped his car apart. They were given no explanation, pressed no charges. After spending two hours in police micro-bus they were released, apparently, because “people made such a big fuss out of this arrest”.

Sandmonkey is home and safe. He’s bruised and slightly injured with pieces of glass. His friends also injured.

The story of their arrest in details, and Sandmonkey’s interview to CNN here.

“5 years ago I was a minority opposition, today – I am the people.”

He was the first person I called when I saw news from Egypt. “I can’t talk, dear, I’m pretty teargased right now”, he said.

I met him in Berlin. It was a blogger conference with participants coming from all around the world. For him it wasn’t the first official international event he was invited to because of his activity. Very soon, we found a lot in common – he would tell me about his society, I would tell him about mine. When the uprise in Egypt began, I couldn’t think of a better person to interview about it.

My interview with him for RFE/RL:

“Sandmonkey” is one of a number of bloggers and activists in Egypt getting the message out of the country through Twitter (he is sending his tweets via a friend in Jordan). RFE/RL’s Azerbaijani Service correspondent Nigar Fatali spoke with him about Internet activism in Egypt and its role in the country’s uprising.

RFE/RL: What does it feel like to live in a country where Internet and mobile phone connections can be shut down by the government at any time?

Sandmonkey: It is not fun [laughing]. It clearly affects you. People are being transported back to 1980; they have to go back from technological progress to using landlines. And most of them don’t even know the landline numbers of their friends to call and check on them. Having no access to the Internet and a curfew are driving people insane. For activists it means the inability to upload pictures and videos of the horrors that are taking place here, while for many other people it basically means the inability to do their job. No one goes to work because there’s no Internet. The banks don’t work because of that; the country in general is in paralysis. The fact that the government can shut down the Internet and phone connection anytime they want is simply unnerving.  

RFE/RL: Why do you blog under a nickname? Do you plan to reveal yourself?

Sandmonkey: I’ve always kept my identity anonymous and I’m not planning to reveal it because some members of my family are affiliated with the ruling NDP party and I don’t want to put them at risk. 

RFE/RL: What is it like to be an activist in Egypt? Do you get oppressed or threatened?

Sandmonkey: These days it actually feels strange; scarier and more exciting. One day you’re breaking barricades, the next day you get tear gassed, and the day after that you try to escape the gunshots of street thugs. But it’s very rewarding because we see ourselves and our people being validated. We’re proud of them for taking responsibility for their destiny and saying “No” for the first time in their lives. Everything about being an Egyptian got redefined in the last days. Before, many people would not agree with us. No one would believe that we could take action or do anything together, as a nation. Today, everybody is with us. Now people believe it’s possible. Five years ago I was a minority opposition. Today, I am the people. And this feeling is indescribable.

Read more…

Быть египтянином сегодня…

My interview with Egyptian blogger and my friend Sandmonkey for Radio Liberty in Russian. Soon to be published in English.

Sandmonkey – никнейм, который выбрал для себя один египетский блоггер и активист, начавший вести свой блог в 2004-м году. Он взял себе ник и скрывает свое настоящее имя из соображений безопасности.

На сегодняшний день sandmonkey является одним из самых популярных блоггеров в Египте – его блог насчитываыет более 5 300 000 просмотров, а его страничку на Twitter отслеживают почти 6 000 человек.

В Египте почти с начала событий введены ограничения на Интернет, а с понедельника прекратил работу последний провайдер. Нигяр Фатали взяла интервью для РадиоАзадлыг у sandmonkey по телефону вечером 31 января.

– Каково это – жить в стране, где правительство может отключить интернет и мобильную связь в любое время?

– Это невесело (смеется). Воздействует на человека. Сейчас люди перенесены обратно в 1980, из технологического прогресса им приходится возвращаться к наземным линиям связи, проще говоря, к городским телефонам. И большинство из них даже и не знает домашних номеров своих друзей и близких. Комендантский час и отсутствие интернета сводит людей с ума.

Активисты лишены возможности загружать фотографии и видео тех страшных событий, которые здесь происходят. Для других отсутствие интернета означает невозможность работать – люди просто перестали выходить на работу. Банки тоже не работают, страна в подвешенном состоянии. Сам факт, что правительство может отключить нашу связь с миром в любой момент настораживает и откровенно нервирует.

– Почему Вы пишите под псевдонимом? Вы планируете раскрыть свое имя своим читателям в свое время?

– Я всегда писал под никнеймом и не собираюсь раскрывать свое имя, потому что некоторые мои родственники тесно связаны с правящей партией и я не хочу подвергать их опасности.

Read more…

 

Emin and Adnan: 17 months that changed things

This post is not about me.

It’s about two people, worth love and respect who had to go to prison. And came back.

And their friends and close ones, who stayed on the other side and didn’t give up.

***

Emin Milli (Abdullayev) being released from prison

Azerbaijani bloggers Emin Milli and Adnan Hajizade were arrested on July 8th, 2009 with the charge of hooliganism after being beaten by two athletic strangers in one of the downtown cafes. Evidences, such as street camera, which showed them, beaten, going to the police station to file complains, as well as many other evidences that could prove them innocent, were not accepted by the court. Testimonies that could help them, were not heard either. After four months of pre-trial detention, Emin Milli and Adnan Hajizade were plead guilty and sentenced 2,5 and 2 years of detention respectively.

But let’s start from the beginning.

Continue reading

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